Rethinking uniting…

separate-hives

Having finally made the decision not to unite my two colonies I felt much better. But then I kept getting a nagging feeling that although both colonies are looking reasonably good, maybe I should unite – to be on the safe(r) side. Everything I read advises erring on the side of caution… and G said that he’d been thinking about it as well and perhaps it would be a good idea. If I had lots of colonies I think I would leave them be – but as I only have these, I don’t want to take the risk and have therefore made the decision – to unite them.

Arriving at the apiary we realised someone had broken in – they had stacked all the chicken wire up in front of the gate – presumably as an early warning. But there was no-one there. They had left the hives alone but broken into the shed. That’s the second break in this summer. It is so depressing as this is such a beautiful and peaceful place with nothing worth stealing. Why can’t people leave what isn’t there’s alone?

Back to my bees. I’ve decided to keep Vic as I think she seems to be the better queen. I’ve never really bonded with Liz (in the nuc). G kindly came to help me. Before removing one queen I had to check the other was actually alive and laying – she was a bit elusive, but I found her in the end. I moved this hive in between the two stands in readiness. Then we found the queen in the nuc and put her into a queen cage. Its very tricky getting the queen and five workers into a small cage – we managed to get three workers to look after and feed her (there is a lump of candy in the cage).

catching-queenHaving done this, we opened the other hive, removed the crown board, and placed a sheet of newspaper over the frames and made two very small slits in it. Then we added a queen excluder and an empty brood. We then moved the frames over from the nuc, added the crown board and closed it up.

uniting

I will now wait a couple of days to see if it has been successful. If so, I will then combine the frames into the bottom box, feed them, treat for varroa*, and hope that they survive the winter.

united

Regarding varroa* treatment. We have already treated all the hives with Thymol, but there has been a very small drop. And I’m not sure if this is good news. But G then tried a different treatment and got a much more significant count. So that’s what I am going to use when I combine the frames.

Lesson to self sometimes you have to be cruel to be kind

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September, here already

I thought I wouldn’t have any honey at all this year but I was wrong, and have  managed to extract 7lbs. Nothing like last year but I am very pleased to have just a little bit. Our local association hires out extractors and I borrowed a manual one. It didn’t take very long and it was a surprisingly unsticky (and delicious) evening.

honeyandtoast

I have also passed my Basic Assessment – which made me very happy. I haven’t taken an exam for so long but I quite enjoyed it. It has been really interesting and useful, but it did make me realise just how much there is to know in the great bee scheme, and just how little I know in comparison. I now need to think about whether or not to start on the BBKA modules.

On a more practical note I needed to decide whether or not to unite my two hives in readiness for the winter. They both seem to be quite happy, and I didn’t know what was best to do. My instinct was to unite them, but my heart didn’t want to. So I thought it best to consult G … who looked through the two colonies with me and thinks that they should be strong enough to over-winter. So thats what I’m going to do. I won’t know if it was a good or bad decision until next year… One thing I do know, is that this year has been a bit up and down with lots of disappointments and things not going to plan. But I have learnt a lot and I have had to think things through. And I have realised that I absolutely love looking after my bees.

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Its that varroa treatment time. Once the honey supers were removed we treated all the colonies in the apiary with Thymovar. The first treatment went on two weeks ago and this will need to be re-applied after three weeks. I did a varroa count over eight days. This was better than last year and the hive had a daily drop of 4 and the nuc had 3. I thought the slider (above) floor looked rather pretty particularly with the different coloured pollen.

This year I have been very concerned about a fair bit of dysentry on the outside of the hive and I wasn’t sure what was causing it. I checked for nosema and that didn’t seem to be present. I may have over-heated the syrup on one occasion which might be the cause. Who knows? I have been trying to be extremely hygienic and making sure all equipment and gloves are thoroughly cleaned before each visit and between hives. Touch wood, it seems to have stopped now.

Also on the disease front I went to the ‘Disease Check’ day held by the association. We checked for nosema and acarine, and both my colonies were clear. That was very good news as nosema was pretty rife in Guinevere’s colony earlier in the year – and that ended in disaster! Its very fiddly trying to remove the bee ‘collar’ to do the acarine test and it took me ages, I seemed to be there all morning, but managed it in the end.